$10 Million In Foster Care Abuse Case


I read the article twice just to make sure I read it correctly. CPS did not see any red flags. Beginning with the fact that the foster care provider was unemployed, she had already returned one child who had been in her care due to alledged health issues- and then when she was asked to take Raffy her comment to CPS was that she didn’t have the money to care for the child and would need DFSA to rush the assistance that is routinely provided to help with costs such as additional food.
She also told a neighbor that the assistance from the District would keep her from being evicted.
The agency checked on the newborn once in 43 days. He was supposed to be visited once a week.
Why was the case worker not charged with neglect as well. Why was the foster care provider only charged with neglect? Why wasn’t CPS charged with child endangerment?
This goes on more than people know. CPS kills more children by snatching them and placing them in foster care than are killed in their own homes.
In Jackson County Ga there are three girls who had a home, their mother was working was not on drugs or alochol and she lost her children. But yet- CPS gives a newborn to a woman who is not working is getting ready to be evicted and has no resources to care for herself- much less a newborn.
What is wrong with this picture? No amount of money will give this child back his life, no amount of money will undo what has been criminally done to him at the hands of a stranger! It is time to stop this abuse by CPS.
It is time to put a stop to them stealing children and placing them in abusive homes. This child had been taken from a drug addicted mother and placed in a stranger’s home to be abused for life – Where is the justification in that act? Who will be held accountable besides the foster care provider?
D.C. settles for $10 million in foster care abuse case
TOOLBOX

By Henri E. Cauvin
Washington Post Staff Writer
Monday, November 8, 2010; 11:43 PM

An abusive foster mother nearly cost Rafael Pearson his life, and now the District has agreed to pay $10 million for placing him with the troubled woman, whose beatings left the boy with massive brain damage.

Rafael was just a few days old when he was taken from his drug-addicted mother and placed in the foster home in fall 2005. Beaten and shaken by his foster mother, the baby suffered catastrophic brain damage. He was on life support for days, not expected to survive. More than five years later, he remains profoundly disabled. He can sense light and shadows and movement but otherwise his vision is extremely limited.

The settlement, to be paid out in three installments, beginning with a $5 million payment this month, is one of the largest the District has ever agreed to.

But with a lifetime of round-the-clock care ahead of Rafael, the settlement is hardly a windfall, his attorneys say – the agreement is structured to ensure that Rafael’s needs are funded for as long as he lives.

The lawsuit, filed in 2007 after the foster mother, Tanya Jenkins, was tried and sentenced to 12 years for cruelty to children, sought $50 million from the District. The suit was about to go to trial in early August in D.C. Superior Court when the parties indicated that they were closing in on a settlement.

Over the next three months, the agreement took shape, and late Friday, after a few final tweaks, the judge in the case, Judith N. Macaluso, approved the pact.

Sitting in the first row of Courtroom 415, in his tiny white Nikes and his black reclining wheelchair, was Rafael. He occasionally uttered sounds, but he cannot speak. Next to him was his grandmother, Sylvia Pearson, 57, who filed the lawsuit on his behalf and who has been his champion since the day in late October 2005 when it looked like Rafael would not survive.

“You can’t replace what would have been a great, normal life,” Pearson said after the hearing, “but I have faith in him and his ability to progress more rapidly than people expect.”

Already, Raffy, as his grandmother calls him, has defied expectations. He made it out of Children’s Hospital. He made it out of the Hospital for Sick Children. And by early next year, he is expected to leave the nursing home in Dunn Loring where he has lived for the past five years.

If all goes according to plan, Raffy will move into his grandmother’s Fairfax Station home, which is being fitted with an elevator and other accommodations, and where he will have a home health aide around the clock.

It could, of course, have been worse. But it also could have been altogether different for Raffy, born Sept. 9, 2005, in a motel in Northern Virginia.

When his mother, Renee Pearson, brought him to Virginia Hospital Center later that day, he was 5 pounds 14 ounces and had traces of cocaine in his system. Concerned, the hospital called child welfare officials in the District, where Renee Pearson said she lived. The social worker couldn’t verify the the mother’s address in Northwest Washington and called the baby’s grandmother.
Sylvia Pearson, who had watched her daughter succumb to drugs and the streets, told the social worker to take the baby. Pearson had already adopted one of her daughter’s children, and her son had adopted the other. Now, they would have to find a way to help Raffy, who was going to stay in foster care while everything was sorted out.

He ended up with Tanya Jenkins, a new foster parent who was unemployed and lived in Southeast Washington with her 2-year-old son and her boyfriend. Earlier that year, another infant had been placed with Jenkins, but she had sent the child back after five weeks, saying she had health problems that made it difficult to care for the small child.

Despite the red flag, the Child and Family Services Agency came to Jenkins five months later when they needed a home for Raffy. Jenkins agreed but said she didn’t have the money to care for the child and would need CFSA to rush the assistance that is routinely provided to help with costs such as additional food.

But even without the additional child, she was struggling, according to testimony at her trial. She told a neighbor that the financial assistance from the District would keep her from being evicted.

Once Raffy arrived, the stress mounted for Jenkins, according to the neighbor, who testified that Jenkins was complaining about never sleeping. Meanwhile, the city’s long-troubled child welfare agency wasn’t keeping tabs on Jenkins or the baby who had been entrusted to her. A social worker should have visited every week for the first eight weeks. The agency made one visit during the 43 days Raffy was in the home.

It was another harrowing episode in the annals of the District’s beleaguered child welfare system, and when they filed suit, Pearson’s attorneys, Sidney Schupak and Michelle A. Parfitt of Ashcraft & Gerel, planned to put the entire system on trial.

Instead, the District agreed to pay one of the largest settlements in its history, as well as $2 million in attorneys’ fees.

Robert J. Spagnoletti, who was the District’s attorney general under Mayor Anthony A. Williams (D), said a settlement as large as the one in this case had never crossed his desk. “It’s a very big settlement,” but not necessarily unreasonable, said Spagnoletti, now a partner at Schertler & Onorato.

Patrick M. Regan, a leading plaintiffs attorney in the District, called the settlement a “significant” sum of money, but said the amount had to be viewed in the context of the needs the child and his family will face over a lifetime. “It’s fair,” Regan said.

D.C. Attorney General Peter Nickles, who was involved in the settlement negotiations, did not return a call today seeking comment.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2010/11/08/AR2010110805565_2.html?sid=ST2010110806347

About yvonnemason

Background:  The eldest of five children, Yvonne was born May 17, 1951 in Atlanta, Georgia. Raised in East Point, Georgia, she moved to Jackson County, Ga. until 2006 then moved to Port St. Lucie, Florida where she currently makes her home.  Licensed bounty hunter for the state of Georgia. Education:  After a 34 year absence, returned to college in 2004. Graduated with honors in Criminal Justice with an Associate’s degree from Lanier Technical College in 2006. Awards:  Nominated for the prestigious GOAL award in 2005 which encompasses all of the technical colleges. This award is based not only on excellence in academics but also leadership, positive attitude and the willingness to excel in one’s major. Affiliations:  Beta Sigma Phi Sorority  Member of The Florida Writer’s Association – Group Leader for St Lucie County The Dream:  Since learning to write at the age of five, Yvonne has wanted to be an author. She wrote her first novel Stan’s Story beginning in 1974 and completed it in 2006. Publication seemed impossible as rejections grew to 10 years. Determined, she continued adding to the story until her dream came true in 2006. The Inspiration:  Yvonne’s brother Stan has been her inspiration and hero in every facet of her life. He was stricken with Encephalitis at the tender age of nine months. He has defied every roadblock placed in his way and has been the driving force in every one of her accomplishments. He is the one who taught her never to give up The Author: Yvonne is currently the author of several novels, including:  Stan’s Story- the true story of her brother’s accomplishments, it has been compared to the style of Capote, and is currently being rewritten with new information for re-release.  Tangled Minds - a riveting story about a young girl’s bad decision and how it taints everyone’s life around her yet still manages to show that hope is always possible. This novel has been compared to the writing of Steinbeck and is currently being written as a screenplay. This novel will be re-released by Kerlak Publishing in 2009  Brilliant Insanity – released by Kerlak Publishing October 2008  Silent Scream – Released by Lulu.com October 2008- Slated to be made into a movie Yvonne’s Philosophy in Life - “Pay it Forward”: “In this life we all have been helped by others to attain our dreams and goals. We cannot pay it back but what we can do is ‘pay it forward’. It is a simple
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5 Responses to $10 Million In Foster Care Abuse Case

  1. Pingback: Tweets that mention $10 Million In Foster Care Abuse Case « How Child Protection Services Buys and Sells Our Children -- Topsy.com

  2. Children have NO VOICE. For years and years this has been going on. It’s all about the money not child saving. My son Charles Cosgrove v SRS in Kansas with his foster mother Alberta Brumley proves this clearly. These people should all go to jail for all the child abuse they have done to many, many Kansas children. Even after her family killed her adopted foster son she kept in a cage. This evil hateful foster mother found a way to make more money off the childs dead body in a wrongful death case. We have no child savers in Kansas or any state as long as we let CPS get by with all of this!!!

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  3. SAM A SAPIENZA says:

    YEAH, SO HOW DO WE STOP THESE COMMUNISTS. THEY SEAL ALL THE RECORDS, WON’T TELL YOU ANYTHING ABOUT THE WELL BEING OF THE CHILD. YOU ASK THEM IMPORTANT QUESTIONS AND THEY TREAT YOU LIKE CRAP. THEY VIOLATE EVERY LAW AND CONSTITUTIONAL PROTOCOL, MISREPRESENT THE FAMILIES IN A PHONY DUE PROCESS THAT DOES ANY THING BUT DUE PROCESS. THEY TAKE ALLEGATIONS FROM DRUG ADDICTS, LOW LIFE’S, SOCIETY’S LOWEST AND ALLOW THEM TO POINT FINGERS AT THE HARD WORKING AND CARING PEOPLE WITH NO LEGAL RECOURSE TO SLANDER. WHO IS ALLOWING THIS AND HOW DO WE FIND THEM? SOMEBODY IMPORTANT MUST BE CAUSING THIS, HOW DO WE FIND THEM AND PUT THEM IN THEIR PLACE.

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  4. Elisa Breitenbach says:

    Sam you are right people have no Due Process. All we can do is do all we can to put light on all of this. My son Charles Patrick Cosgrove has made it back to the 10th Circuit in Denver for the third time. He has won the last two times. Only to come back to Kansas and have Judge Crow toss it out. This time we are ready for the first time we have an Attorney also ready. It’s been 27 years of this for my family. We know the truth about these people. We have a truck load of records I have uncovered. We should never stop uncovering the corruption and injustice our families have all had to live with. It’s a system set up to abuse children because it’s all done behind closed doors as most abuse is. We need to open up the records and the courtrooms to save our children and families from this. Our job is to prove the truth about these people anyway we can and NEVER STOP!

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  5. Elisa Breitenbach says:

    Sam I am on facebook are you? It’s a good place for this to be talked about.

    Like

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